Feeding the Community One Backpack at a Time

backpack

January 22, 2016

Auburn Hills, MI – Reliance One, Inc. is proud to announce their sponsorship of  Backpack Night 2016 hosted by Shard Financial Services, Inc. and the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan.

Backpack Night is a project taken on by the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan which makes an effort to reduce child hunger, provide education to students on proper nutrition, and encourage healthy lifestyles. The program was created to offer additional support to children who rely on free or reduced-price lunches at school. It provides a backpack full of nutritious foods every weekend throughout the school year so that no child goes hungry. The number of children that are eligible for free or reduced lunch in Michigan is staggering. In Genesee County alone, there is a 55% eligibility rate.

The program states that childhood hunger is a community problem that the community can solve. There are many ways to help. A donation in support of the program is the best way to help the cause. A $100 contribution feeds a child every weekend during the school year. You can also get involved with local community schools and help bring the program to your local district or you could volunteer your services to help fill backpacks during the school day. For more information on the program and ways to help, please visit http://www.backpacknight.com/backpack-program/.

About Reliance One:

Reliance One Inc. is a minority-owned, MMSDC-certified staffing corporation headquartered in Michigan with a focus on matching the ideal professional to a client’s specific needs for both long-term, short-term, or project based positions (including temporary, temporary to direct, or direct).

Contact

Reliance One, Inc.
1700 Harmon Rd.
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
248-922-4500
Robert Wicker
rwicker@reliance-one.com
Fax: (248) 922-5660
www.reliance-one.com

The Fruits of Labor

July 31, 2014

A team from Reliance One recently spent a day at the Forgotten Harvest of Southeast Detroit. Matt, Ognen, Jen, and Max spent the day picking summer squash that was eventually distributed to families in the Detroit area. The task was daunting as there were eight rows of squash that stretched over a half mile long. The team pulled together to pick the squash off the vines, as well as pull up the plants so that the fields could be reseeded the following day.

“Volunteering was a great way to bring our team closer together while also impacting others. It was fun, but it was also hard work. It really made us appreciate the people that are out there every day making a difference in other’s lives,” said Matt Van Norman, Account Manager at Reliance One. The team said that working on the farm was without a doubt physically taxing; however, the optimism of the entire volunteer group made for an enjoyable day of service.

About Forgotten Harvest:

http://www.forgottenharvest.org/

The mission of Forgotten Harvest, founded in 1990, is to relieve hunger in the Detroit metropolitan community by rescuing extra, prepared and perishable food and donating it to emergency food providers. This donated food, which would otherwise go to waste, is delivered free-of-charge to 280 emergency food providers in the Metro Detroit area.

About Reliance One:

http://www.reliance-one.com

Reliance One Inc. is a minority-owned, MMSDC-certified staffing corporation headquartered in Michigan with a focus on matching the ideal professional to a client’s specific needs for both long-term, short-term, or project based positions (including temporary, temporary to direct, or direct).

Media Contact:

Reliance One, Inc.
1700 Harmon Rd.
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
248-922-4500
Robert Wicker
rwicker@reliance-one.com

Forgotten Harvest – R1 Impact Through Serving Others

March 3, 2014

Last Thursday was Reliance One’s kick off of our “Day of Service” for our R1 Impact Volunteer program! Two of our employees, Kristen and Caitlin, volunteered their time at the Forgotten Harvest in Oak Park and helped with their warehouse re-pack program.

While at Forgotten Harvest, they unpacked Little Caesar Pizza kits and then repacked them for sorting and delivery. Alongside that, they inspected other food items and sorted them according to what condition they were in. Upon entering the warehouse, they were informed that the facility had strict rules that needed to be followed to ensure cleanliness. “Everyone was required to wear both a hair net and an apron. We were required to make sure our hands were clean at all times and wear gloves,” said Kristen Latimer, Administrative Services Manager.

On their return from volunteering, Kristen and Caitlin informed us on how they were impacted by Forgotten Harvest and how they felt they had impacted them. They stated that they were significantly impacted by realizing how much they take for granted on a daily basis. It was a very humbling experience to realize that by making 300 pizza kits, they helped to feed 300 families. They said they felt like an impact on Forgotten Harvest by being a set of extra helping hands. Every extra hand there meant more food packages for a family in need.

About Forgotten Harvest:

http://www.forgottenharvest.org/

The mission of Forgotten Harvest, founded in 1990, is to relieve hunger in the Detroit metropolitan community by rescuing extra, prepared and perishable food and donating it to emergency food providers. This donated food, which would otherwise go to waste, is delivered free-of-charge to 280 emergency food providers in the Metro Detroit area.

About Reliance One:

http://www.reliance-one.com

Reliance One Inc. is a minority-owned, MMSDC-certified staffing corporation headquartered in Michigan with a focus on matching the ideal professional to a client’s specific needs for both long-term, short-term, or project based positions (including temporary, temporary to direct, or direct).

Media Contact:

Reliance One, Inc.
1700 Harmon Rd.
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
248-922-4500
Robert Wicker
rwicker@reliance-one.com

R1 Impact

FH front

KL CW

harvey

Healthy Mac and Cheese

In honor of National Cheese Day, which is June 4, what better recipe to feature than one of the cheesiest – Mac and Cheese. With healthy alternatives to the traditional recipe, it is light in calories and fat. Enjoy!Mac and Cheese LiteMac and Cheese Lite

Makes: 4 servings

Ingredients
Nonstick cooking spray
Salt
4 ounces whole wheat macaroni
1/2 cup onion-garlic puree (see “Rocco’s Secret Weapon,” below)
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
Pinch cayenne pepper
1 cup shredded 50 percent reduced-fat cheddar
1/3 cup nonfat Greek yogurt
1/4 cup whole wheat panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup grated Parmesan

Directions 
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Mist an 8-by-8-inch baking dish with cooking spray; set it aside.
  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add macaroni and cook according to package directions, drain.
  3. Meanwhile, bring onion-garlic puree, mustard, and cayenne to a simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring often. Whisk in cheddar until melted. Remove from heat and whisk in yogurt.
  4. In a medium bowl, toss the macaroni with the cheese sauce. Season with salt to taste. Pour the mixture into the prepared baking dish and sprinkle panko over the top. Top with Parmesan.
  5. Bake until Parmesan is melted and macaroni is hot throughout, about 10 minutes.

Nutrition facts per serving (about 2/3 cup): 237 calories, 17g protein, 31g carbohydrate, 7g fat (4g saturated), 3g fiber

Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix creates Michigan jobs

BELLE ISLE (WXYZ) – The Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix will have a major impact on the Detroit area economy.

It is estimated that the week-end events will pump at least $55 million dollars into our economy and create thousands of jobs.

For example, the catering company that will be supplying the corporate suites will be employing 1,000 workers. Executives from Andiamo tell 7 Action News that they have been planning for months.

Stewart Davidson of Andiamo says they are making a conscious effort to employ not only Michigan workers, but also highlight Michigan specialties.

Davidson says, “We want to show the best of Michigan to our Grand Prix guests.”

Corporate Chef Jim Oppat says that they reached out to local culinary schools and charitable organizations to make sure that the jobs stay local. Andiamo will be running seven kitchens on the island and preparing 10,000 meals daily for visitors to the corporate suites.

Billy Jensen is especially excited about working for the race.

Jensen tells Action News, “I’m really glad the race is back. I love anything with fast cars.”

Originally posted on:
http://www.wxyz.com/dpp/money/auto_news/chevrolet-detroit-belle-isle-grand-prix-creates-michigan-jobs#ixzz1wNxx8fOY

Home barbecue 101: Memorial Day ribs

Disclaimer: Not my ribs

Disclaimer: Not my ribs

If there is a holiday that marks the beginning of the backyard barbecue season, it has to be Memorial Day. Though it is a year-round practice in my house, I always make a point to fire up the smoker at some point over the long weekend for some ‘cue.

I’ve already talked about how easy it is to smoke some pulled pork at home. But sometimes, when I don’t have enough time to prep a butt, or too full of a schedule to man the Egg for 10-12 hours, I go to the next best thing: Spare ribs.

Yes, spare ribs. While I’ll never turn down a tender rack of baby backs, I’m very partial to the meatier, porkier spare rib. The notion that baby back ribs are always more tender than spares is false, assuming that the spare ribs are properly smoked. A key exception to this is if you are so pressed for time that you have to cook the ribs at a temp higher than 250 degrees. In that case, the spare ribs won’t work out well, and you should stick to baby backs.

So, for you rib rookies, here is a crash course that you can put to good use this weekend.

Comparatively, there is much less work that goes into smoking a good rack of ribs, and the end product is just as much of a crowd pleaser.

A few key things to note:

– If you boil your ribs, stop reading this right now and go bash your head against a wall. The word “blasphemous” doesn’t do it justice. You are dead to me now.

– Prep work is crucial to a good rack of ribs. Like leaving the giblets in the turkey, forgetting to remove the pleura – AKA, the silver skin, a thin membrane lining the bone side of the ribs – will ruin an otherwise promising rack. The membrane gets rubbery and gross.

– “Fall off the bone” isn’t what you are shooting for (unless that is how you prefer your ribs). If the meat dissolves off of the bone, they are overcooked.

– If you are working with a small grill space, use a rib rack, but be careful. Don’t over crowd the ribs, there needs to be proper airflow between them racks. Also, make sure you flip the ribs halfway through, or the meat closest to the grill will overcook.

Ask your butcher if the membrane has been removed when you buy them. If not, ask if they can do it for you. And if the answer to that is no, removing the membrane yourself SHOULD be pretty easy (as in this video), but that stuff can get pretty slippery. When it comes time to grab it and pull, use a paper towel to get a little better grip.

Once the membrane is off, you can throw on marinade or brine if you’d like and refrigerate overnight. However, I usually find that to be unnecessary. I prefer to pat the ribs down with a good rub, let them rest while I fire up the egg, and then throw them straight on.

Assuming you are going with spare ribs, you definitely want to go low and slow. Keep the temperature between 225-250, for around 3-5 hours, depending on the thickness and size of your ribs.

As always, time is much less important than temperature. You are shooting for 180-190 degrees (I’d take them off no later than 185, lest they wind up like a pile of Houston’s overcooked “fork and knife” ribs). But the challenge with ribs is that getting an accurate read on a thermometer can be difficult.

Instead, you are going to have to do it by feel, which is somewhat of a contradiction in a post aimed at beginners. There are numerous ways to check the doneness…if a toothpick slides into the meat with little to no resistance, they are probably done. Pick up one of the racks with a pair of tongs…if they droop, and the meat cracks on the surface as though it is about to break, pull them off. Obviously, if the bone slides right out, pull them immediately – they are overcooked.

If you choose to apply a sauce, wait until the meat is ready before putting on the first coat. A coat of surgery sauce can turn gummy in the grill if applied too early. I like to avoid using too much mop sauce so as to not turn the bark soggy. I’m a fan of the Memphis-style dry rib, and I usually just leave the sauce on the side at the table. If you see that tell-tale pink ring on your meat, and have a good rub on there, that should be all that you need.

So, what is going onto your grill this weekend?

– By Jon Watson, Food & More blog

5:00 am May 25, 2012